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Coast Guard: 3 dead, 1 missing in mishap during yacht race off Calif., Mexico coasts
#21
I still don't know why my suggestion that the last gps point (50) was simply the still-working device washed up on the island after the collision that turned the Aaegean to shreds. Not possible?
BajaNoMas= News, Facts, Stats, Videos, Pics and Links- because presenting the truth to the public is not a negative campaign "Decir la verdad no es ninguna campaña negra".
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#22
(05-03-2012, 08:44 AM)Woooosh Wrote: I still don't know why my suggestion that the last gps point (50) was simply the still-working device washed up on the island after the collision that turned the Aaegean to shreds. Not possible?

Possible, but it also quit transmitting at the same time. So if it survivied a collision and started floating, why would it then quit? Also the speed of the last segment was the same as the prior segment.

I projected out the course of the Aegean from the data points. It was headed directly for Ensenada harbor. If you look at the pings from the GPS, it was only making a few knots headway and its course had curves in it, indicating it was under sail, until 9:46PM. At 9:46PM it's speed increased to close to 7 knots, indicating they went under power, as that was twice the wind speed. In addition, after 9:46PM, the course was as straight as an arrow, indicating they were on autopilot.

I predict the findings will show that at 9:46PM they went under power. Whoever was navigating punched into the GPS/autopilot the instructions to "go to Ensenada" directly from their current position. That course took them directly into the north Coronado Island.

[Image: 264ot9v.png]

I also read somewhere that the Aegean had radar, which would have easily painted the island before they hit it.
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#23
(05-03-2012, 09:24 AM)Fulano Wrote:
(05-03-2012, 08:44 AM)Woooosh Wrote: I still don't know why my suggestion that the last gps point (50) was simply the still-working device washed up on the island after the collision that turned the Aaegean to shreds. Not possible?

Possible, but it also quit transmitting at the same time. So if it survivied a collision and started floating, why would it then quit? Also the speed of the last segment was the same as the prior segment.

I projected out the course of the Aegean from the data points. It was headed directly for Ensenada harbor. If you look at the pings from the GPS, it was only making a few knots headway and its course had curves in it, indicating it was under sail, until 9:46PM. At 9:46PM it's speed increased to close to 7 knots, indicating they went under power, as that was twice the wind speed. In addition, after 9:46PM, the course was as straight as an arrow, indicating they were on autopilot.

I predict the findings will show that at 9:46PM they went under power. Whoever was navigating punched into the GPS/autopilot the instructions to "go to Ensenada" directly from their current position. That course took them directly into the north Coronado Island.

[Image: 264ot9v.png]

I also read somewhere that the Aegean had radar, which would have easily painted the island before they hit it.


I got this from an acquaintance whose friend has raced the event in the past.

The Aegean was in the “Cruiser” class where they are allowed to motor (with associated penalties). Often in this race after dark they will fire up the motor and set the auto pilot. Without the need for a sail trimmer, only the helmsman is on watch. If the auto pilot does not have a GPS interface, it is set with a compass heading only.

He says the racers often go either side of the Coronados. If the tide and currents are westerly, a compass-only heading leading you outside the islands soon becomes a course right into them.

Note length and direction of the SPOT track. Given where the race started, where the track begins, and the straight line of the track, it is not hard to imagine it getting dark, setting the autopilot and compass heading, and then by 1:36AM, the helmsman falling asleep. Two of the bodies died of blunt force trauma and the third drowned. They probably had time to realize what was happening
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#24
(05-03-2012, 04:40 PM)natomas Wrote:
(05-03-2012, 09:24 AM)Fulano Wrote:
(05-03-2012, 08:44 AM)Woooosh Wrote: I still don't know why my suggestion that the last gps point (50) was simply the still-working device washed up on the island after the collision that turned the Aaegean to shreds. Not possible?

Possible, but it also quit transmitting at the same time. So if it survivied a collision and started floating, why would it then quit? Also the speed of the last segment was the same as the prior segment.

I projected out the course of the Aegean from the data points. It was headed directly for Ensenada harbor. If you look at the pings from the GPS, it was only making a few knots headway and its course had curves in it, indicating it was under sail, until 9:46PM. At 9:46PM it's speed increased to close to 7 knots, indicating they went under power, as that was twice the wind speed. In addition, after 9:46PM, the course was as straight as an arrow, indicating they were on autopilot.

I predict the findings will show that at 9:46PM they went under power. Whoever was navigating punched into the GPS/autopilot the instructions to "go to Ensenada" directly from their current position. That course took them directly into the north Coronado Island.

[Image: 264ot9v.png]

I also read somewhere that the Aegean had radar, which would have easily painted the island before they hit it.


I got this from an acquaintance whose friend has raced the event in the past.

The Aegean was in the “Cruiser” class where they are allowed to motor (with associated penalties). Often in this race after dark they will fire up the motor and set the auto pilot. Without the need for a sail trimmer, only the helmsman is on watch. If the auto pilot does not have a GPS interface, it is set with a compass heading only.

He says the racers often go either side of the Coronados. If the tide and currents are westerly, a compass-only heading leading you outside the islands soon becomes a course right into them.

Note length and direction of the SPOT track. Given where the race started, where the track begins, and the straight line of the track, it is not hard to imagine it getting dark, setting the autopilot and compass heading, and then by 1:36AM, the helmsman falling asleep. Two of the bodies died of blunt force trauma and the third drowned. They probably had time to realize what was happening

Could the Aegean get torn to little shreds running into an island going that slow? I haven't seen the wreckage.
BajaNoMas= News, Facts, Stats, Videos, Pics and Links- because presenting the truth to the public is not a negative campaign "Decir la verdad no es ninguna campaña negra".
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#25
Skipper identified in fatal yachting accident

CORONADO (CNS) - A body found floating in the ocean near the Coronado Islands Sunday was positively identified Tuesday as skipper Theo Mavromatis, one of four people killed in a yachting accident late last month.

A fisherman found the 49-year-old Redondo Beach man's body about 2:30 p.m. Sunday, according to the San Diego County Medical Examiner's Office.

The office listed his cause of death as blunt-force injuries.

Mavromatis and three other men were taking part in an annual Newport-to-Ensenada race when their 37-foot boat dropped off the event's vessel-tracking system about 1:30 a.m. April 28, according to the Newport Ocean Sailing Association, which stages the competition.

Searchers later that day found the bodies of William R. Johnson Jr., 57, of Torrance; Kevin Rudolph, 53, of Manhattan Beach; and Joseph L. Stewart, 64, of Bradenton, Fla.

Autopsies determined that Johnson and Rudolph died of blunt-force trauma and that Stewart drowned. The U.S. Coast Guard suspended its effort to find Mavromatis on April 29.

A floating debris field initially suggested that Mavromatis' Hunter 376, the Aegean, may have collided with a larger vessel, although officials have also speculated that the yacht may have struck some rocks. The accident occurred just south of the U.S.-Mexico border, about eight miles off the Baja California coast.

The fatalities were the first in the 65-year history of the annual Newport-to-Ensenada race.

http://www.cbs8.com/story/18189611/skipp...g-accident
Más vale pocos pelos, pero bien peinados.
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#26
Families in San Diego yacht race accident appear headed for wrongful death lawsuit

Two South Bay families who grieved together following the deaths of a captain and his crewman in a San Diego yacht race are headed for what might be a contentious court battle over money.

Already, family members have sparred on Facebook and in Internet postings following the filing of court paperwork that could lead to a wrongful death lawsuit.

"It is so sad to me that we can no longer share friendly brunches together," Anna Mavromati wrote in a blog posting last week.

Mavromati's father, Theofanis Mavromatis, 49, captained the boat found in pieces floating April 28 off the Coronado Islands.

"For the record, my dad is not responsible for anyone's death, including his own," the daughter said.

The hostile exchanges online occurred last week after the family of crewman Kevin Rudolph, 53, served the Mavromatis family with papers petitioning a court to administer Mavromatis' estate.

The men, along with William Reed Johnson Jr., 57, of Torrance, and Joseph Stewart, 64, of Bradenton, Fla., died during the Newport Beach-to- Ensenada regatta. Debris from Mavromatis' boat, The Aegean, was found scattered in waters about eight miles off the Mexican coast.

The U.S. Coast Guard continues to investigate the crash to determine what happened and has not issued an official report. US Sailing, the sport's governing body, issued its findings in June, saying the 37-foot Hunter sailboat ran aground on North Coronado Island.

Mavromatis' family disputes the report as premature.

On Oct. 17, Mavromatis' survivors - his wife, Loren; daughters, Anna and Christina; and 11-year-old son Xan - were served with a "Notice of Petition to Administer Estate of Theofanis M. Mavromatis" and told they must appear Nov. 13 in a Los Angeles courtroom.

Randi Geffner, an attorney representing the wife of crewman Rudolph, Leslie Rudolph, said the court filing was part of a process to file a lawsuit.
"This is the first step in a wrongful death claim," Geffner said.

The law required service to all of Mavromatis' heirs, including his young son.

Anna Mavromati quickly took to Facebook to complain about the court filing.

"I am so sorry for the loss of Leslie Rudolph, Samantha Rudolph and Ryan Rudolph," Mavromati said. "I know how terrible their loss is because my family has been going through the same. That said, being served paperwork from the Rudolph family's lawyer today attempting to take control of my father's estate is a great additional stress to my family on top of everything else."

Leslie Rudolph responded, saying, "Anna, your mother is the one that said there is insurance on the boat and that I should go after it."

"Your mother and I did discuss it. This is the means to accomplish this, and we haven't `taken over the estate.' I am sorry for your loss too. I know first-hand how difficult this is and what a loss we've all suffered. These were wonderful husbands and fathers and they are missed terribly."

Rudolph added that it was she who reached out to members of the Mavromatis family and invited them to her home for dinner and brunch.
"I also packed up food for your family," she said. "Your family never invited us to your home."

Geffner said Mavromati misunderstood the paperwork, but acknowledged a lawsuit could be filed against her father's estate before April 28, 2013, the one-year anniversary of the crash.

The attorney said that because Mavromatis' family does not have a probate administrator, the filing on Oct. 11 seeks to have a neutral administrator named on Nov. 13.

Probate experts told the Daily Breeze it is likely that Mavromatis' family will contest the appointment of the neutral administrator, and that a judge likely will appoint Mavromatis' mother as administrator of her husband's affairs. That would enable the Rudolphs to file a claim against her husband's estate, which she will likely decline, opening the way for the lawsuit.

Geffner said the court filing is not an attempt to control Mavromatis' estate. She said Mavromatis' wife, Loren, suggested family members receive money from the boat's insurance. The court filing was part of that procedure.

"The creditors' claim has to be filed within a year of the death. It's been six months now. It was time to start the process if we need to go that way," Geffner said.

Geffner said the Rudolphs are not attempting to pit the families against each other. But, she said, a lawsuit could be coming.

"All we know conclusively is that there was a horrible tragedy. It was their boat," the attorney said. "We're all trying to piece together how that happened. Something went wrong, clearly. The information we have leads us to believe there may be several sources of negligence that caused this horrible tragedy - not just limited to the owners of the boat.

There may be other negligent parties."

http://www.contracostatimes.com/californ...ear-headed
Más vale pocos pelos, pero bien peinados.
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