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Veterans Without Borders
#1
I don't know if many of you know about the plight of veterans who have been deported here in Baja. Many foreign (Mexican, Filipino or Puerto Rican, etc) men join the US Military with the promise that they will be on the fast track to citizenship following their service. In many cases the US Govt has reneged on this promise. If the vet gets into legal problems he is deported. If he had ben given citizenship as promised he could get help instead of deportation. Many of the vets problems are result of their service in war zones (mental and physical). Many get addicted to pain killers or have post traumatic stress issues. I am not saying that they are all angels and some did not deserve to be deported because of drug busts. I'm just saying that they need justice. Each should be able to get their day in court. They have a petition at http://WWW.veteranswithoutborders.com. they need 100,000 signatures. Right now they only have 10,000. I come across deportees all the time, and it is the same story. Their parents did not do the paperwork and after 9/11 the nightmare began for many. These deportees are different. They served and who willing to die. They deserve some consideration…………..thanks Chris Romero
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#2
For their voice to be heard, I will sign. Thanks for sharing!

Will spread the word. I don't have much of a social media outreach, but know others who do.
“How, unless you drink as I do, could you hope to understand the beauty of an old Indian woman playing dominoes with a chicken?” -- Malcolm Lowry, Under the Volcano
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#3
In the 1990's the immigration law was modified to include more crimes that were a basis for deportation. Being convicted of any felony or serving more than 365 days in prison are a basis for deportation. Had any of these vets become naturalized US citizens before committing the crimes, they most likely would not have been deported.

http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/P...PartF.html
Más vale pocos pelos, pero bien peinados.
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#4
Screw them. It would have been easy for them to become US citizens after serving in the military but they chose not to. They are all convicted criminals, so good riddance and enjoy your new life in Mexico.
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#5
That's a wow. Intersting perspectives.
BajaNoMas= News, Facts, Stats, Videos, Pics and Links- because presenting the truth to the public is not a negative campaign "Decir la verdad no es ninguna campaña negra".
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#6
Always two sides to a story ... hard to take them case by case, however, that is the only fair way of going about it ... IMHO
Suicide Hot line, Pete here, please hold
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#7
hard for them to bring their cases while deported to Mexico. They probably should have done it (citizenship) when they had the chance. Woulda, coulda, shoulda...
BajaNoMas= News, Facts, Stats, Videos, Pics and Links- because presenting the truth to the public is not a negative campaign "Decir la verdad no es ninguna campaña negra".
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#8
Funny but last time I checked you cannot be a Mexican national and join the US armed forces.
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#9
(04-02-2014, 12:11 AM)elektra Wrote: Funny but last time I checked you cannot be a Mexican national and join the US armed forces.

A non-citizen legal resident of the US can join the US armed forces, but cannot be a commissioned or a warrant officer. Back during the Vietnam war, legal residents were drafted into the the US Army.
Más vale pocos pelos, pero bien peinados.
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#10
Legal resident=has green card.
Illegal aliens from Mexico aren't legal residents, so I should have qualified my post: "you cannot be an illegal alien from Mexico and join the US armed forces."
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