Indigenous women in Mexico have limited access to health services

Translated by Fulano from an article in JornadaBC.mx

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Mexico City, September 8, 2017 – Affiliation with health services does not assure an effective access for indigenous women. For this reason, that sector of the population has twice to risk of dying from preventable illnesses than the rest of the women in Mexico.

This happens because in these communities health care services are not available, lack the quality needed, or lack the capacity to resolve, and this represents a violation of the rights to health for this population. Other factors are low education levels and poor housing conditions.

This was the conclusion of the report, “The Right of Healthcare for Indigenous Women in Mexico.” This was a national analysis of cases from the perspective of human rights prepared jointly by the National Commission for Human Rights and the Center for Investigation and Higher Studies in Social Anthropology.

Diabetes and cirrhosis, both preventable illnesses, are the first and second causes of death for women who live in indigenous municipalities. The gaps in health are most evident in maternal mortality rates, as indigenous women have twice the death rate during pregnancy, child birth or postpartum, when compared to women who do not live in these communities. Among the women of the Sierra Tarahumara, in Chihuahua, they have four times the risk of death from these causes.

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