Mexico Says Its Troops Killed US Man

Joseph Proctor

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Joseph Proctor told his girlfriend he was popping out to the convenience store in the quiet Mexican beach town where the couple had just moved, intending to start a new life.

The next morning, the 32-year-old New York native was dead inside his crashed van on a road outside Acapulco. He had multiple bullet wounds. An AR-15 rifle lay in his hands.

His distraught girlfriend, Liliana Gil Vargas, was summoned to police headquarters, where she was told Proctor had died in a gunbattle with an army patrol. They claimed Proctor — whose green van had a for-sale sign and his cell phone number spray-painted on the windows — had attacked the troops. They showed her the gun.

His mother, Donna Proctor, devastated and incredulous, has been fighting through Mexico’s secretive military justice system ever since to learn what really happened on the night of Aug. 22.

It took weeks of pressuring U.S. diplomats and congressmen for help, but she finally got an answer, which she shared with The Associated Press.

Three soldiers have been charged with killing her son. Two have been charged with planting the assault rifle in his hands and claiming falsely that he fired first, according to a Mexican Defense Department document sent to her through the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City.

The rest of the news story here.

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Mexico Responsible For Rapes: Inter-American Court of Human Rights Says

The Inter-American Court of Human Rights condemned Mexico on Monday for failing to protect the rights of two indigenous women who were raped by soldiers in 2002.

In two separate rulings, the Costa Rica-based court said Mexico failed to guarantee the rights to personal integrity, dignity and legal protection of Valentina Rosendo and Ines Fernandez, both of southern Guerrero state.

It was the fourth condemnation of Mexico from the court, which previously issued rulings against the government for the unsolved killings of women in the border city of Cuidad Juarez in the 1990s and for the country’s “dirty war” in the 1970s.

Rosendo, then 17, was washing clothes in a river in February of 2002 when eight soldiers came up and asked her about the whereabouts of a masked suspect. When she said she didn’t know anything, she was beaten and raped.

A month later, in another indigenous community in Guerrero, at least 11 soldiers approached Fernandez in her house and asked for her husband. She didn’t respond because she didn’t speak Spanish, and the soldiers raped her.

No one was punished in either case.

The court ruling requires the government of Mexico to compensate both women and publish the court rulings in Spanish and the women’s indigenous language, Me’phaa. The government said it will follow the rulings, the Interior Department said in a statement. “The government of Mexico reiterates its full commitment to the promotion and protection of human rights, in particular to combat violence against women and girls,” the statement said.

Link to the article.

I wonder if this would be an inopportune time to bring up the issue that “Mexico seeks to ensure that its citizens present in the U.S. are accorded the human and civil rights granted under the U.S. Constitution,” as Mexico said in its filing on the SB1070 appeal?

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US Cuts Aid To Mexico Over Human-Rights Abuses

The U.S. State Department cut $26 million from an upcoming $175 million aid payment to Mexico due to the country’s alleged human-rights abuses in its war against drug cartels, the Arizona Republic reported Saturday.

This is the first time the U.S. decided to withhold funds over human-rights abuses since launching its $1.4 billion Merida Initiative aid program in 2008 to help Mexico combat rampant drug trafficking and organized crime.

Link to news story,

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